ITALIAN COOKING AND RECIPES   Authentic And Traditional  Italian Food Recipes
BAY LEAF = ALLORO  Fresh bay leaves, come from the laurel tree and they're usually used in bouquets garni's, stocks, and braises. A leaf or maybe more  put into to sauces and soups and  removed once the flavour discharged in to dish. Bay leaves being used more frequently than any other herb. They are available both fresh and dried, with dried being the most popular type. Fresh bay leaves are glossy and dark green on top, and soft green underneath it.   They're very aromatic, having a bit of a bitter taste. When they dry, their colour turns into a matte olive green and their flavour is stronger. Although dried bay leaves are usually more easily accessible, when you can get fresh ones, try them. They're usually within the herb section of supermarkets. Bay leaves discharge their flavour through slow cooking, therefore, the longer the better. Consider including bay leaves to casseroles, stews, soups, marinades, pasta sauces. Bay leaves additionally give a fantastic flavour to white, sauces (for instance, béchamel sauce).  The flavour of bay is developed perfectly with steaming. Try out with vegetables, fish, seafood, or chicken with a steamer. Always remove soon after cooking and before serving. Even though bay leaves provide a pleasant flavour to the food , they are not appetizing in themselves. Anyone who has ever bitten in to the overlooked bay leaf will instantly verify this! Fish it out before serving the meal . This is the reason why it is advisable to put the whole bay leaf into the meal, so it is easy to remove easily afterwards. Avoid breaking it up in to small pieces.   The aromatic leaf from the bay laurel tree, it is an important part of traditional bouquet garni. The bittersweet, herb  provide their  flavour into a a number of dishes and ingredients, making bay an essential cupboard ingredient. It’s also one of the few herbs that doesn’t lose its flavour when dried. Properly sealed, dried bay leaves can last around 2 years before losing their scent.
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